Psychological First Aid

Number of credits: 6 ECTS Price: 840 €
Price for UAB students*: 200 €
*Max. 5 places
Teaching Language: English Place: UAB Campus

Teaching Period: 25 June to 12 July

Contact: summer@uab.cat

Professor: Ingeborg Porcar, Alicia Álvarez and other professionals from the Public Health System and the Crisis Response Teams 

Enrol now!

Enrolment guidelines
 


PROFESSOR BIO INFORMATION

Ingeborg Porcar, Master's degree in clinical psychology. Certified as a crisis and disaster psychologist specialized on trauma, PTSD and ASD. Founder and technical director at the UTCCB, the Crisis Center at the Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB). Lecturer at the same University. From 2010 to 2017 she was member of the Standing Committee on Crisis and Disaster Psychology at the EFPA. Together with a medical colleague at the Public Health Agency of Barcelona, she was in charge of the planning and then the supervision of the response to the terror attacks in 2017 since 2016.

Alicia Álvarez, PhD in Clinical Psychology, Certified as a crisis and disaster psychologist specialized on trauma, PTSD and ASD. Care & Research Coordinator at UTCCB, the Crisis Center at the Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB). Psychologist at Barcelona Council working at assessment and recovery of abused & neglected children. Clinical Psychology Lecturer at University Oberta de Catalunya. Member of the Spanish network of psychological response after a terrorist attack.
 

ACADEMIC GUIDE

Contents overview


As it is known, Psychological First Aid (PFA) is an evidence-informed approach for assisting all the population in the aftermath of a critical event. PFA ameliorates symptoms of Acute Stress Disorder (ASD) and prevents Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In this course you will be trained in the application of PFA on both massive and daily emergencies. You will become a community health worker prepared to cope with highly stressful situations everywhere.

Contents
Week 1

  • Definition of Acute and Post-traumatic Stress and Psychological First Aid.
  • Aims and application of PFA.
  • Patterns of response in the aftermath of a critical event.

Week 2

  • PFA for children.
  • PFA for teenagers and adults.
  • Risk factors.
  • Protective factors.
  • PFA as part of preventive monitoring.

Week 3

  • Psycho-education skills.
  • Group techniques.
  • Self-care techniques for responders.
  • The importance of a correct triage process.
  • Other considerations applying PFA.


Teaching / learning activities

Week 1

  • Video teaching.
  • Clinical discussion.
  • Role-playing.
  • Problem solving.
  • Team-work.

Week 2

  • Video teaching.
  • Clinical discussion.
  • Role-playing.
  • Problem solving.
  • Team-work.

Week 3

  • Video teaching.
  • Clinical discussion.
  • Role-playing.
  • Problem solving.
  • Team-work.
  • Final seminar on intervention design.


Evaluation

1. Every morning we will first do a short test to help us to check if we should revisit certain concepts. The average grade of these tests makes 30% of the final grade.

2. Class attendance and Moodle discussion will make 20% of the final grade.

3. During the course, the students will apply the proposed competencies to an incident of multiple victims of his/her interest, based on real situations proposed by the professors. The final evaluation will consist of the complete design of the best possible intervention in that crisis and the presentation of that design before the group of colleagues of the same course in a final seminar. This is a group work and will account for 50% of the final grade.
 

Links and references
 
  • National Center for PTSD. (2000). Psychological first aid. Field Operations Guide, 2nd Ed. http://www.nctsn.org/content/psychological-first-aid
  • Australian Psychology Society. (2013). Psychological First Aid. An Australian guide to supporting people affected by disaster.
  • Cook, J. & Newman, E. (2014). A consensus statement on trauma mental health: the New Haven competency conference process and major findings. Psychological trauma: theory, research, practice and policy, 6(4), 300-307.