Gastronomy & Oenology

Number of credits: 6 European Credits Transfer and Accumulation System (ECTS) Price: 840 €
Price for UAB students*200  
*Max. 5 places
Teaching Language: English Place: UAB Campus Bellaterra (Cerdanyola del Vallès)

Teaching Period: 13 to 31 July

Contact: summer@uab.cat

Professor: Xavier Carmaiu-Mainadé

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Enrolment guidelines


PROFESSOR BIO INFORMATION


Xavier Carmaniu-Mainadé has a PhD in History and he is professor of Advertising and Cultural Heritage at the UAB Tourism School (EUTDH-UAB). He is also a specialist in the divulgation of cultural subjects in the media. He has a wide experience with students of study abroad programs.
 

ACADEMIC GUIDE

Contents overview


We need to eat and drink to survive but we don't settle for anything. Why do we spend hours cooking dishes that we eat in minutes? Why do we keep wine bottles for years before opening them?

Not only do we eat food and liquids, but we enjoy and share them. In fact, there are those who more than eat to live, live to eat. Gastronomy and enology are the disciplines that study an activity that has been part of human culture since time immemorial. In this course we will explain the ancestral relationship that exists between the human species and food and drink. And we will do so from a privileged place: Barcelona, a creative, innovative and, above all, Mediterranean city.

These qualities have made it the epicentre of today's world gastronomy thanks to its ability to combine its culinary tradition with the modernity of the present.

Week programme
 

Week Contents Teaching / learning activities
1 1.1. Welcome

1.2. Barcelona, city of a sea of wine, oil and wheat

1.3. Why is Serrano ham salted?

1.4. Techniques for preserving food

1.4. A world of spices

1.5. Visit to the Museum of the History of Catalonia
The professor's explanations will be combined with the use of supplementary material such as readings and documentaries.

In addition, self-guided activities and group dynamics will be carried out in the classroom.

Visits will be made to reinforce the more theoretical classes.
2 2.1. Banquets to show off. Power through gastronomy and oenology

2.2. Why are we going out to dinner?

2.3. A Sweet Religion: Catholocism and Patisserie Coffee or tea?

2.4. Route through the historical cafés of Barcelona.
 
The professor's explanations will be combined with the use of supplementary material such as readings and documentaries.

In addition, self-guided activities and group dynamics will be carried out in the classroom.

Visits will be made to reinforce the more theoretical classes.
3 3.1. A toast to life (specific oenology class)

3.2. Practical Oenology (use of the tasting room)

3.3. Gastronationalism: the homeland of taste

3.4. Presentation of students' projects

3.5. Last day, farewell.
       
The professor's explanations will be combined with the use of supplementary material such as readings and documentaries.

In addition, self-guided activities and group dynamics will be carried out in the classroom.

Visits will be made to reinforce the more theoretical classes.


Evaluation

In order to pass the course, the participation of the students in the classes, the activities of the field visits as well as the realization of a final project will be valued.

The final project topic will be related with the content of the course. The projects will be exposed on the penultimate day of class.

The weight of the grade is distributed as follows:

  • 20% participation in class
  • 20% field visit activities
  • 60% final project (30% paper + 30% presentation)


NOTE that one day before the end of the period the student’s performance must be completely evaluated and communicated to summer@uab.cat.


Links and references
 
  • Albala, K. Routledge international handbook of food studies. Routledge, 2012.
  • Counihan, C. and P. Van Esterik. Food and Culture: A Reader. Routledge, 2012.
  • DeSoucey, M. “Gastronationalism Food Traditions and Authenticity Politics in the European Union” in American Sociological Review, n. 3 (June 2010): pp. 432-455.
  • Donahue, J. Food and drink in antiquity: Readings from the Graeco-Roman World: A sourcebook. Bloomsbury, 2015 
  • Flandrin, J.L. & M. Montanari. A Culinary History of Food. Columbia University Press, 1999. Goldstein & Merkle. Culinary cultures of Europe: identity, diversity and dialogue. Council of Europe, 2005.
  • Grivetti & Shapiro (ed). Chocolate: history, culture, and heritage. Wiley, 2009. Hyman P. Bistros! What they were and what they are. Petits propos culinaires. Prospect Books, 2014, n° 100, P. 132-142.
  • Montanari, M. Food is culture. Columbia University Press, 2004. Norton, M. Sacred Gifts, Profane Pleasures: A History of Tobacco and Chocolate in the Atlantic World. Cornell University press, 2010.
  • Parasecoli & Scholliers. A Cultural History of Food (6 vols). General Editors, 2015.
  • Pendergrast, M. Uncommon Grounds: The History of Coffee and how it transformed our world. Basic Books, 2010.
  • Rebora, G. (translated by Albert Sonnenfeld). Culture of the Fork: A Brief History of Food in Europe. Columbia University Press, 2001.