Boehringer Ingelheim award for a UAB project

The project "Assessment of the vertical transmission of PRRSV1 in unstable farm: effect of parity and neutralizing antibody titers" by Jordi Soto was recently awarded one of the three European PRRS Research Awards.

15/01/2018

The project directed by pre-doctoral researcher Jordi Soto Vigueras from the Department of Animal Health and Anatomy and entitled "Assessment of the vertical transmission of PRRSV1 in unstable farm: effect of parity and neutralizing antibody titers" won one of the three European Awards for Research Studies into Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS), conferred by Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health and worth 25,000 euros each.

The other winners in this fourth edition of the awards are a French research team and one from the Complutense University of Madrid. The objective of these awards is to foster the development of practical PRRS control methods and to acknowledge the scientific excellence existing in this field.

The award fosters academic interactions and exchanges between researchers and veterinarians since the awards ceremony takes place during the annual European PRRSpective conference, in which international experts in porcine health participate.

In this new edition of the European PRRS Research Awards, Boehringer Ingelheim increases its support to research into improving the control on PRRS in Europe and around the world. In addition to the three awards of this edition and the over 50 PRRS projects which have received funding in the United States and China, the company has already allocated over one million euros to funding research into this porcine disease.

The call for projects for the 2018 edition of the European PRRS Research Awards will open in February and includes new agreements to help veterinarians present their research proposals.

 

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